Difference between revisions of "Hauptseminar Porous Media SS 2021/Reaction diffusion advection with FEM"

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{{Seminartopic
 
{{Seminartopic
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|number=7
 
|topic=Reaction-diffusion-advection systems with finite elements
 
|topic=Reaction-diffusion-advection systems with finite elements
|speaker= TBD
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|speaker= Kristin Lorenz
|date=4.5.2021
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|date=2021-06-18
|time=TBA
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|time=15:30
 
|tutor=[[Patrick Kreissl]]
 
|tutor=[[Patrick Kreissl]]
 
|handout=
 
|handout=
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== Contents ==
 
== Contents ==
  
TBA
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The ''Finite Element Method'' (FEM) is a computational technique that can be used to solve coupled systems of (non-linear) ''partial differential equation'' (PDEs) numerically. A key aspect of this method is the discretization of a large simulation domain into smaller, so-called ''finite elements'' over which the solution to the respective PDE can be well approximated. Refining the mesh locally in the regions of the simulation domain that are critical for the physical effects (charged walls, in-/outflow regions, catalyst regions consuming/producing chemical species, …), this typically allows one to study systems on an experimental length scale, even for setups with complex geometries.
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Obviously, this makes FEM also an interesting tool for the simulation of porous systems.
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This talk will introduce FEM and show how the method can be used to solve the reaction–diffusion–advection equations. To illustrate this, an example system will be presented, namely a microfluidic pump based a ion-exchange-resin in a slit-pore geometry.
  
 
== Literature ==
 
== Literature ==
  
TBA
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<bibentry>
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ehrhardt16a
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rempfer16a
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niu17a
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</bibentry>

Latest revision as of 09:49, 4 March 2021

Date
2021-06-18
Time
15:30
Topic
Reaction-diffusion-advection systems with finite elements
Speaker
Kristin Lorenz
Tutor
Patrick Kreissl

Contents

The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a computational technique that can be used to solve coupled systems of (non-linear) partial differential equation (PDEs) numerically. A key aspect of this method is the discretization of a large simulation domain into smaller, so-called finite elements over which the solution to the respective PDE can be well approximated. Refining the mesh locally in the regions of the simulation domain that are critical for the physical effects (charged walls, in-/outflow regions, catalyst regions consuming/producing chemical species, …), this typically allows one to study systems on an experimental length scale, even for setups with complex geometries. Obviously, this makes FEM also an interesting tool for the simulation of porous systems.

This talk will introduce FEM and show how the method can be used to solve the reaction–diffusion–advection equations. To illustrate this, an example system will be presented, namely a microfluidic pump based a ion-exchange-resin in a slit-pore geometry.

Literature