Difference between revisions of "Owen Hickey"

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<setdata>
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{{Person
name=Hickey, Owen
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|name=Hickey, Owen
title=
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|status=PhD student
status=PhD student
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|phone=63594
phone=63594
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|room=210
room=210
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|email=ohickey
email=ohickey
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}}
image=                 
 
</setdata>
 
{{MemberTop}}
 
  
==Research==
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== Research ==
 
I am currently doing research for my PHD at the University of Ottawa.  I am visiting Dr. Christian Holm's group for 2009.  My research consists of modeling electro-osmotic flow (EOF) using molecular dynamics simulations.  EOF plays a large role in the emerging field of microfluidics as it occurs in almost every microfluidic device.  My research focuses on understanding how polymer coatings can be used to control the EOF, a practice which is widespread experimentally.
 
I am currently doing research for my PHD at the University of Ottawa.  I am visiting Dr. Christian Holm's group for 2009.  My research consists of modeling electro-osmotic flow (EOF) using molecular dynamics simulations.  EOF plays a large role in the emerging field of microfluidics as it occurs in almost every microfluidic device.  My research focuses on understanding how polymer coatings can be used to control the EOF, a practice which is widespread experimentally.
  
==Publications==
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== Publications ==

Revision as of 16:59, 11 June 2010

Placeholder.jpg
Owen Hickey
PhD student
Office:210
Phone:+49 711 685-63594
Fax:+49 711 685-63658
Email:ohickey _at_ icp.uni-stuttgart.de
Address:Owen Hickey
Institute for Computational Physics
Universität Stuttgart
Allmandring 3
70569 Stuttgart
Germany

Research

I am currently doing research for my PHD at the University of Ottawa. I am visiting Dr. Christian Holm's group for 2009. My research consists of modeling electro-osmotic flow (EOF) using molecular dynamics simulations. EOF plays a large role in the emerging field of microfluidics as it occurs in almost every microfluidic device. My research focuses on understanding how polymer coatings can be used to control the EOF, a practice which is widespread experimentally.

Publications